Making Scents of it all

the most prominent scent,i've heard is olfactory.It's the time traveling scent.Laundry smells can transport me to my cousin's house back when I was in 3rd grade.mmm taste like it smells!
hipsterfood:

i made these super quick pizzas for lunch today. these specifically include:
our quick pizza dough
tomato sauce
salted & herbed cashew cheese (make this in advance and you can use it for everything!)
mushrooms & onions first browned in coconut oil then reduced with white wine
salt & pepper on top
my favorite part is how easily the dough comes together - we make it with our roommates at least once a week for pizza, calzones, hot pockets, etc. these work best on a pizza stone but a regular metal pan is fine too. try it out for a thin-crusted easy dinner or lunch!

hipsterfood:

i made these super quick pizzas for lunch today. these specifically include:

  • our quick pizza dough
  • tomato sauce
  • salted & herbed cashew cheese (make this in advance and you can use it for everything!)
  • mushrooms & onions first browned in coconut oil then reduced with white wine
  • salt & pepper on top

my favorite part is how easily the dough comes together - we make it with our roommates at least once a week for pizza, calzones, hot pockets, etc. these work best on a pizza stone but a regular metal pan is fine too. try it out for a thin-crusted easy dinner or lunch!

hipsterfood:

Easy Almond Milk
We just realized that one of our kitchen staples, homemade almond milk, wasn’t fully posted on our blog. Technically we had a post, THREE years ago (!) but it wasn’t extremely comprehensive. Here’s how to make some almond milk for yourself!
Obviously you can buy it, but I like making my own when I need a LOT or if I’m out of it, which is often because it usually comes in such small containers. Also, you save a lot on packaging & shipping by making it yourself.
What you’ll need:
almonds, about .5-1.5 cups depending on how much you want to make
water!
a blender
a mesh bag (like we used in our chai concentrate the other day)
a funnel
a large bowl, preferably with a spout
bottles/jars with tops for storage (we use old pasta sauce jars, very useful things)
How to make it:
Pour the almonds into the large bowl, then cover with water. Leave them to soak for a couple of hours, ideally 8 hours if you have a less powerful blender. The longer you soak them, the creamier your outcome. I usually go with 1.5 cups almonds, which makes enough milk for a week’s worth in our house and fits nicely in our blender. I don’t think it needs to be exact, just check the consistency as you go to make it how you want/need it.
Drain the water and rinse the almonds. Pour them into a blender with enough water to cover, then about a cup or two more. Blend on high for a few minutes, or until the almonds are completely pulverized and it’s creamy and smooth.
In your large bowl, place the mesh bag in it, folding it over the sides of the bowl so that you don’t make a mess. Pour the milk into the bag, lift the sides of it and squeeze the liquid out into the bowl. Do this until all that’s left in the bag is dried almond pulp.*
Pour the strained liquid into your storage jars, using a funnel if necessary. Repeat the straining until everything in your blender is gone.
Pour 1/4 tsp vanilla and a dash of cinnamon into each jar, then stir to combine. If you’d like sweetened milk, add in 1 tbsp maple syrup or other liquid sweetener and give it a shake. (I like to add these after straining so you get the full flavor.)
*If you’re interested in not wasting a bit of this process, save the almond pulp! You can either use it again to make more milk (great for baking) or use it in baked goods such as pie crusts, crackers, or in batters. Just store it in a sealed container in the fridge for up to two weeks. (I haven’t tried storing it longer than that, though I’m sure you could.)
This milk lasts about 5-7 days in the fridge - use it in cereal, baking, curries, hot chai, or to make creamy smoothies! I’ll be using it tomorrow for my birthday cake, which might grace the blog ;)
If you’re looking for more non-dairy milk recipes, we have a REALLY comprehensive guide in the Spring 2013 issue of Chickpea Mag - there are recipes to make use of the almond pulp, how to make make milk out of pretty much any nut/seed/grain, best techniques, and best add-ins for each type. Check it out here in print or digitally.
Enjoy! :)

hipsterfood:

Easy Almond Milk

We just realized that one of our kitchen staples, homemade almond milk, wasn’t fully posted on our blog. Technically we had a post, THREE years ago (!) but it wasn’t extremely comprehensive. Here’s how to make some almond milk for yourself!

Obviously you can buy it, but I like making my own when I need a LOT or if I’m out of it, which is often because it usually comes in such small containers. Also, you save a lot on packaging & shipping by making it yourself.

What you’ll need:

  • almonds, about .5-1.5 cups depending on how much you want to make
  • water!
  • a blender
  • a mesh bag (like we used in our chai concentrate the other day)
  • a funnel
  • a large bowl, preferably with a spout
  • bottles/jars with tops for storage (we use old pasta sauce jars, very useful things)

How to make it:

  1. Pour the almonds into the large bowl, then cover with water. Leave them to soak for a couple of hours, ideally 8 hours if you have a less powerful blender. The longer you soak them, the creamier your outcome. I usually go with 1.5 cups almonds, which makes enough milk for a week’s worth in our house and fits nicely in our blender. I don’t think it needs to be exact, just check the consistency as you go to make it how you want/need it.
  2. Drain the water and rinse the almonds. Pour them into a blender with enough water to cover, then about a cup or two more. Blend on high for a few minutes, or until the almonds are completely pulverized and it’s creamy and smooth.
  3. In your large bowl, place the mesh bag in it, folding it over the sides of the bowl so that you don’t make a mess. Pour the milk into the bag, lift the sides of it and squeeze the liquid out into the bowl. Do this until all that’s left in the bag is dried almond pulp.*
  4. Pour the strained liquid into your storage jars, using a funnel if necessary. Repeat the straining until everything in your blender is gone.
  5. Pour 1/4 tsp vanilla and a dash of cinnamon into each jar, then stir to combine. If you’d like sweetened milk, add in 1 tbsp maple syrup or other liquid sweetener and give it a shake. (I like to add these after straining so you get the full flavor.)

*If you’re interested in not wasting a bit of this process, save the almond pulp! You can either use it again to make more milk (great for baking) or use it in baked goods such as pie crusts, crackers, or in batters. Just store it in a sealed container in the fridge for up to two weeks. (I haven’t tried storing it longer than that, though I’m sure you could.)

This milk lasts about 5-7 days in the fridge - use it in cereal, baking, curries, hot chai, or to make creamy smoothies! I’ll be using it tomorrow for my birthday cake, which might grace the blog ;)

If you’re looking for more non-dairy milk recipes, we have a REALLY comprehensive guide in the Spring 2013 issue of Chickpea Mag - there are recipes to make use of the almond pulp, how to make make milk out of pretty much any nut/seed/grain, best techniques, and best add-ins for each type. Check it out here in print or digitally.

Enjoy! :)

rhamphotheca:

Should We Close Part Of The Ocean To Keep Fish On The Plate?

by Alastair Bland

For lovers of fatty tuna belly, canned albacore and swordfish kebabs, here’s a question: Would you be willing to give them up for several years so that you could eat them perhaps for the rest of your life?

If a new proposal to ban fishing on the open ocean were to fly, that’s essentially what we might be faced with. It’s an idea that might help restore the populations of several rapidly disappearing fish – like tuna, swordfish and marlin — that we, and future generations, might like to continue to have as a food source.

The novel conservation plan, introduced recently in a in the journal PLoS Biology, would close international waters – where there’s currently pretty much a fishing free-for-all — to all fishing and restrict commercial fishermen to coastal areas managed by individual nations. The authors, and , suggest turning the open ocean into a worldwide reserve for the migratory species that travel huge distances…

(read more: NPR)

images: Alex Hofford/EPA /LANDOV and PLoS Biology

braiker:

this note went out from the principal of PS 321 in Park Slope. not my kids’ school, but i am so goddamn down with this message. my 3rd grader had her tests this week — no 8 year old should be this stressed out over a wholly irrelevant reading comp test. 

braiker:

this note went out from the principal of PS 321 in Park Slope. not my kids’ school, but i am so goddamn down with this message. my 3rd grader had her tests this week — no 8 year old should be this stressed out over a wholly irrelevant reading comp test. 

(via theawl)

newyorker:

The relationship between a young woman and her mobile banking app: http://nyr.kr/1e4yq9M

Mobile Banking: Your $213.16 debit-card transaction with URBAN OUTFITTERS 14 ST was above your $125.00 Alert setting and totally unnecessary. Why did you buy WIND IN MY WINGS ROUND SUNGLASSES? It’s not even summer. And the ECOTE FLORAL CROCHET BRA TOP makes you look like one of those girls who go to music festivals.
Me: STOP.
Mobile Banking: I’ll STOP when you stop.

Illustration by Gary Taxali.

newyorker:

The relationship between a young woman and her mobile banking app: http://nyr.kr/1e4yq9M

Mobile Banking: Your $213.16 debit-card transaction with URBAN OUTFITTERS 14 ST was above your $125.00 Alert setting and totally unnecessary. Why did you buy WIND IN MY WINGS ROUND SUNGLASSES? It’s not even summer. And the ECOTE FLORAL CROCHET BRA TOP makes you look like one of those girls who go to music festivals.

Me: STOP.

Mobile Banking: I’ll STOP when you stop.

Illustration by Gary Taxali.

(Source: newyorker.com)